Grades at a Glance

Washington State apples are subjected to the most stringent grading standards in the country. In 1915, the State established the first grade standards in the nation for apples. The U.S. Department of Agriculture adopted national grade standards for apples eight years later in 1923.

Today, Washington apples may be packed according to Washington State standards or U.S. standards. The hierarchy of grades from Washington, starting with the highest, is:

  • Washington Extra Fancy
  • U.S. Extra Fancy
  • Washington Fancy
  • U.S. Fancy
  • U.S. No. 1
  • U.S. No. 1 Hail

Washington Grades More Stringent

Learn more about grades of apples

Combination grades are rarely packed in Washington. Grading standards are minimum requirements. Apple quality may exceed the grade marked.

Apple Sizes at a Glance

Size Weight Diameter
48 14.0 oz. 3.64" / 92.5 mm
56 12.0 oz. 3.52" / 89.4 mm
64 10.5 oz. 3.40" / 86.4 mm
72 9.3 oz. 3.29" / 83.6 mm
80 8.4 oz. 3.19" / 81.0 mm
88 7.6 oz. 3.05" / 77.5 mm
100 6.7 oz. 2.93" / 74.4 mm
113 5.9 oz. 2.84" / 72.1 mm
125 5.4 oz. 2.75" / 69.9 mm
138 4.8 oz. 2.68" / 68.0 mm
150 4.5 oz. 2.62" / 66.6 mm
163 4.1 oz. 2.54" / 64.5 mm
175 3.8 oz. 2.46" / 62.5 mm
198 3.4 oz. 2.39" / 60.7 mm
216 3.1 oz. 2.31" / 58.7 mm

Apples are packed in 40-pound fiberboard cartons (most packers put in at least 42 pounds to accommodate a little moisture loss in shipment). And they are designated by count -- the number of apples in each carton. The largest packed size is 48, which means there are 48 apples in each box -- a very large piece of fruit. Supplies of these large apples usually are very limited. The table above shows each size and its approximate weight and diameter.

Washington crops traditionally peak on sizes 100 and 113. The difference in dimension between sizes is approximately 1/8-inch.